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For my first deck profile here, I’m going to review the Soulful variant of the Oracle Think Tank clan.  In the current Japanese meta, there are two main builds available for OTT: Soulful and Soulless.  Currently, the Soulless build is mostly unplayable in English, as the bulk of the cards necessary to build it won’t get an English release until Set 7 makes it overseas.  However, the Soulful build focuses mainly around cards from Sets 1 and 3, which have already been localized.  As you can probably guess, Soulful OTT involves shoving lots of cards into your Soul.  However, contrary to typical expectations, the contents of the Soul itself is actually quite irrelevant toward the desired win condition of this deck.  In order to understand this win condition, we first need to cover a few of the key units of this deck, and the strange mechanic that makes this deck tick.

The End-Game Stack

The Oracle Think Tank, as you might gather from the word ‘Oracle’ in their name, is a clan of fortune-tellers.  They are adept at reading into the future, and many of their card effects reflect this image.  Several of their units allow you to look at the top card of your deck, and place it either at the top or the bottom of your deck.  In the short run, this is an excellent way of ‘predicting’ when you’ll pull a trigger, and allow you to more confidently make plays.  However, predicting what’s coming to you at the top of your deck isn’t the only benefit to this effect.  By deliberately arranging cards at the bottom of your deck, you can set yourself up for the perfect draws and trigger checks near the end-game.  Coupled with the amazing draw power that OTT supports and their abilities that Soulcharge cards from your deck, you can easily thin yourself down to the cards that you carefully arranged the entire time.  That is called the End-Game Stack (to be referred to as the ‘stack’ from now on).  With units that send up to 5 cards from the top of the deck to the bottom, to units that selectively send cards from the top of the deck to the bottom, it is fairly easy to arrange the stack in a way that can more or less guarantee your victory.  Regardless of the opponent’s strength, having the ability to consistently hit double-triggers in the end-game generally spells defeat for them.  Reaching that stack is the ideal win condition of this deck, and the units that the Oracle Think Tank offers you are among the best in the game at doing just that.

Decklist: Soulful OTT

To understand the reasoning behind each of the cards that I put here, read further down the page.  I originally had this at the end of the post, but I figured that people would be lazy and want to see it closer to the top.

Vanguard:

  • 1x Godhawk, Ichibyoshi

Grade 0:

  • 4x Lozenge Magus (Heal)
  • 4x Psychic Bird (Crit)
  • 1x Oracle Guardian, Nike (Crit)
  • 3x Victory Maker (Draw)
  • 2x Dream Eater (Draw)
  • 2x Miracle Kid (Draw)

Grade 1:

  • 4x Oracle Guardian, Gemini
  • 4x Battle Sister, Chocolat (Perfect Guard)
  • 4x Goddess of the Crescent Moon, Tsukuyomi
  • 1x Battle Sister, Cocoa
  • 1x Weather Girl, Milk

Grade 2:

  • 4x Goddess of the Half Moon, Tsukuyomi
  • 2x Silent Tom
  • 2x Oracle Guardian, Wiseman
  • 2x Battle Sister, Mocha
  • 2x Oracle Guardian, Red Eye

Grade 3:

  • 3x CEO Amaterasu
  • 4x Goddess of the Full Moon, Tsukuyomi

***Grade 0 Units***

Starting Vanguard: Godhawk, Ichibyoshi.

Currently, there are only two viable choices for an OTT starting Vanguard: Your Heal Trigger (Lozenge Magus / Sphere Magus), and Godhawk, Ichibyoshi.

  • Godhawk, Ichibiyoshi is the only non-trigger Grade 0 OTT has, and it has the effect of allowing you to check the top 5 cards of your deck for ‘Goddess of the Crescent Moon, Tsukuyomi (Grade 1), superior-ride it if it’s one of those top 5 cards (can’t normal ride in the same phase), rearrange any of the 4-5 cards that you checked, and place them at the bottom of your deck. Simply put, it’s a fantastic starting vanguard, for a variety of reasons. This card starts the trigger stacking process with a hefty 4-5 card donation. If you miss out on getting a grade 1, this offers you 5 extra chances at potentially pulling one that you can use. If you manage to find Crescent with Godhawk’s check, it’s a +1 toward hand-advantage (as you didn’t have to ride from your hand). With a clan that’s highly focused on maintaining a large card-advantage, it can actually be worth delaying the grade-1 ride another turn just to get the Crescent Moon reveal (and for the extra 5 cards you get to stack). With the current English cards out, there is little to no reason to not use Godhawk as your starting vanguard.  Since we’re building the Soulful variant, having the entire Tsukuyomi Line
  • Lozenge Magus and Sphere Magus are the two potential Heal Triggers of the OTT Clan, and they both have the effect of moving to the rearguard when they’re ridden over, and getting shuffled back into the deck after they boost a unit. By choosing one of these as a Starting Vanguard, you can potentially shove in one more grade 1/2 unit. However, by calling them to the rear-guard, you miss out on an extra soul, and after boosting, a deck shuffle will ruin any trigger-stacking already in play. If you wanted to make some attempt at a Soulless build, this is a fair choice. But, you should really just wait till set 7 to come out until you build that, and by then, you’ll have Little Witch, LuLu to take over the starting vanguard position.  Since we are trying to build the Soulful build here, using Lozenge / Sphere Magus actually harms the strategy, and contributes nothing toward the Tsukuyomi ride chain, so we will avoid using these cards for the Starting Vanguard.

Triggers

Currently, OTT has 2 Heal Trigger units, 1 Stand Trigger unit, 2 Critical Trigger units, and 3 Draw Trigger units in its arsenal. So, regardless of your personal opinions, you’re going to run at least 4 Draw triggers, no questions asked. If you don’t like drawing cards, you’re clearly playing the wrong clan. The 4 Heal triggers are also virtually a necessity, especially in late-game play. If you somehow end up exhausting most of the cards in your deck, and are fearing an eventual deck-out, then by continually boosting with Lozenge Magus or Sphere Magus and tossing it back into the deck, you can slowly replenish your deck (and keep reusing the heal trigger, which in itself is hilarious). So, we’re at 4 Heal, 4 Draw. As far as the stand trigger goes, OTT lacks the type of units that other clans typically use stand triggers with. Cards like Oracle Guardian Red-Eye and Secretary Angel could potentially reuse their effects with this, but unboosted 9ks and less are going to have issues getting an attack to land, even if you use the 5k bonus on them instead of your Vanguard. So, my advice would be to avoid using Stand triggers here. As far as Critical Triggers go, it’s more or less imperative that you include 4 Psychic Birds. Not only is it a critical trigger; offering a well-needed 10k shield, but it also has an effect allowing you to Soulcharge it and draw a card. So, of course, you’re going to include those. Now, we’ve got 4 Heal / 4 Draw / 4 Crit. The only issue left is how to split up the other 4 slots with a mix of Critical and Draw triggers.

  • 4 Heal / 4 Draw / 8 Crit: You’ll see this option recommended quite often. People love critical triggers, and for pretty good reason. They essentially turn one powerful attack into two powerful attacks (or more, if you twin-drive two crits). If you can get to your end-game trigger stacks, you can reliably dish out criticals with every vanguard attack. Critical triggers themselves have 10k shield (as opposed to the 5k of a Draw trigger), and you’ll find that OTT generally lacks in that department. However, Critical triggers are of little use when drawn as a damage check, and other clans tend to be more offensive than OTT. Many of the cards that rely on you having a large hand to make the most of (Amaterasu, Weather Girl, Mocha, etc.) won’t be as useful, and it will take you longer to reach your end-game stack, where you typically end up slaughtering your opponent regardless of what trigger you drew.  They work fairly well in tandem with Tsukuyomi and a hand-boosted Amaterasu, as a natural 11k attacker often has little issue landing an attack.
  • 4 Heal / 8 Draw / 4 Crit: This is another one of the three commonly recommended variants. It maximizes the draw power that fuels the end-game OTT strategy and fills your hand with cards at all stages of the game. If you’re going to spend the early phase of the game crippling their rear-guards and attempting to avoid putting the opponent in Limit Break for a while, then you’re going to appreciate hitting Draw triggers after a vanguard attack a lot more than you will a Crit. Not to mention, Draw triggers and Heal triggers are the only ones that give you a meaningful effect upon a Damage check. When you go to stack these, you’re able to shove a desired non-trigger card after one of these, so that you can use the trigger to draw that card. However, this approach isn’t without its weaknesses. It’s not suited for an early-game victory; a goal that most other clans tend to aim for. Draw triggers only have a dinky 5k shield, and if you’re going to attempt to guard a 28k attack, you’ll have to dump up to 4 of these to guard the attack, which is generally bad for hand-advantage (of course, there are ways around that). Not to mention, Draw triggers aren’t exactly intimidating on a drive-check. The 5k boost is always welcomed, but you lack much of the unpredictable damage swing that Critical triggers bring.
  • 4 Heal / 6 Draw / 6 Crit: The last of the three commonly recommended distributions; it is in essence a compromise between the above two. It’s slightly harder to predict than the above two, which is helpful in case your opponent keeps asking to check your soul / drop zone / damage zone to count your triggers. I’ll save you the effort of reading what could be a long paragraph, in the hopes that you can imagine what this distribution would play like, after reading the 4/8/4 and 4/4/8 distributions.
  • 4 Heal / 12 Draw: No Psychic Birds, it’s shit.  I do admire the dedication toward drawing, and it could potentially work.  But, Psychic Bird is just too good to pass up.
  • 4 Heal / 8 Crit / 4 Stand: wut
  • 4 Heal / 5 Draw / 7 Crit: It’s a good way to throw someone off that’s attempting to count the triggers you have remaining. But, once your typical opponent sees two Oracle Guardian Nike’s in play, they’ll assume that you’re running 8 crits, instead of 7. It’ll change how they play against you, but you still lack firepower as opposed to what they anticipate. I would personally stick with 4H/4D/8C over this option.
  • 4 Heal / 7 Draw / 5 Crit: In my opinion, this is the most mind-gamey of any of the distributions here. Any knowledgeable opponent will assume that you’re running at least 4 Lozenge Magus / Sphere Magus (Heal), 4 Psychic Birds (Critical), and 4 unspecified Draw triggers. The moment that they see a critical trigger that isn’t a Psychic Bird (Oracle Guardian Nike), they instantly start reevaluating their game-plan; anticipating either a 6D/6C or a 4D/8C build. Of course, they saw the only Nike you had in your deck, and with each draw trigger that you pull, and with each knowing grin you show them as you look at the top card of your deck, they’ll see nothing but ghostly visions of critical triggers, and overguard the hell out of your Vanguard. This build also has the speed benefit of the 4/8/4 build, allowing you to reach your end-game criteria that much faster.

Recommended Grade 0’s (17):

  • 1x Godhawk, Ichibiyoshi (Starting Vanguard)
  • 4x Lozenge Magus (Heal)
  • 4x Psychic Bird (Crit)
  • 1x Oracle Guardian, Nike (Crit)
  • 3x Victory Maker (Draw)
  • 2x Dream Eater (Draw)
  • 2x Miracle Kid (Draw)

***Grade 1 Units***

In this section, you’ll see that we don’t have a lot of variety available, as far as what should go into a good deck. This means less work for us, but it also means that it’s fairly simple to guess at what grade 1 units your average OTT player is using. OTT units generally lack offensive power, so these units are imperative toward allowing you to hit the ‘Magic Numbers’ (the damage amounts that force your opponent’s typical 8k/10k/11k unit to have to guard more heavily to defend against). You’ll also quickly notice that we only have three units that have above 6k base attack. Fortunately, many of the weaker units here make up for their lack of offensive power with their abilities.

Pretty much necessary:

  • Oracle Guardian, Gemini: Your typical 8k, non-effect booster unit. It allows Silent Tom to hit for 16k, CEO Amaterasu to generally hit at 22k (because it’s not hard to have 4 cards in your hand after Twin Drive!!), and Goddess of the Full Moon, Tsukuyomi to hit for 19k. If you decide to ride this card for some reason, 8k is an easily guardable amount for early-game play. Regardless of clan chosen, this type of card is typically always run, and run in 4’s. OTT isn’t an exception here. Run 4 of them.
  • Battle Sister, Chocolat: This card is the Perfect Guard for OTT. Just about every playable clan has one of these. If you guard with this unit and discard a card from your hand, it’ll stop an attack of any power. With 6k attack and an effect that can only be used when it’s in your hand, it’s next to useless as a Grade 1 ride (I’d seriously consider skipping a ride phase if this was my only option, especially with the prospect of a second check with Ichibyoshi). Many clans are still deciding whether or not it’s more effective to run 3 or 4 of their Perfect Guard. With a draw-heavy deck like OTT, however, there is no such debate. Run 4 of them.
  • Goddess of the Crescent Moon, Tsukuyomi: The second member of the Tsukuyomi ride chain, this card inherits the vanguard effect of Godhawk, Ichibiyoshi, that allows you to check the top 5 cards of your deck upon your next ride phase to look for Goddess of the Half Moon, Tsukuyomi for that Superior Ride (can’t perform a normal Ride in that same turn). Not to mention, the cards that you check get added to your stack at the bottom of your deck in the order that you choose, helping you get to your end-game stack of perfectly-aligned triggers. On top of that, it has 7k attack. This allows Silent Tom to hit 15k, forcing a 10k vanguard to drop two cards in order to guard an attack. This card is part of your preferred ride chain. Run 4 of them.

Recommended:

  • Battle Sister, Cocoa: One of the few cards in this clan that has an effect unique to the clan. If you call this unit to the field as a Vanguard/Rearguard, it allows you to look at the top card of your deck, and place that card on the top or bottom of the deck. An incredibly helpful card for trigger-stacking and preemptively pulling a trigger on that turn’s drive check, the only downfall this card has is that it’s only a 6k booster. If you opt to ride this as your Grade 1 Vanguard, the effect is quite nifty. However, you’re going to eat some major damage on your next turn, as a typical attack against the Vanguard at that stage in the game is anywhere between 12k-18k. Even for a 12k attack, you would be forced to drop either a 10k shield, or multiple 5k shields. I’d only recommend using two at most, as you typically have little issue in the late game, as far as seeing the card at the top of your deck (CEO Amaterasu does that for better-than-free each turn).
  • Weather Girl, Milk: This card is a nifty addition to the clan, that plays perfectly toward OTT’s strengths. Though it’s typically a non-threatening 6k booster that performs poorly as a Vanguard (I’d probably skip the ride-phase if this was my only choice), it boosts your Vanguard by an additional 4k if you have 4+ cards in your hand (before you attack). If you’re playing correctly, this should be no issue to you, and allow you to hit the highest damage numbers this deck allows. A boosted Goddess of the Full Moon, Tsukuyomi will be able to reach 21k, and CEO Amaterasu will swing for a staggering 24k, disregarding triggers. Since it’s only useful when boosting a Vanguard, I’d only recommend using two at most.
  • Circle Magus: In short, this is a slightly stronger Cocoa with a watered-down effect. It’s the last of the three 7k+ OTT boosters (Gemini and Crescent Moon are the other two), which is already a fairly-desirable quality. When you call it to the field as a Vanguard/Rearguard, you can look at the top card of your deck, and place it back on the top. While it doesn’t contribute toward the end-game stack, you can still anticipate triggers. If you want to get rid of that top card for another chance at a trigger, or just really want that top card, you can use Psychic Bird’s Soulcharge effect to draw it.  As with Cocoa, I’d only recommend using two at most.
  • Dark Cat: Currently unavailable in English.  Dark Cat is another 7k booster, which are always appreciated members of the clan.  Upon calling it to the field, you and your opponent can both decide to draw a card.  This card is typically bad for maintaining card advantage, as it is a +1 for your opponent (they get a card for nothing, you got a card at the cost of using a card).  However, as Dark Cat isn’t necessarily expended after using it, it can help replenish your hand in the early game, and allow you to draw cards that you’ve checked with Circle Magus / Cocoa.  Since there are better Grade 1 units available, I’d only recommend using two at most.

Honorable Mentions:

  • Luck Bird: Right now, there aren’t many cards that take advantage of the massive quantities of soul you end up accruing over the game. Luck Bird is one of those special few. When you call it to Rearguard, you can Soulblast 2 to draw a card. Drawing is nice, and without conditions like removing a card from your hand or having to Counterblast, it’s definitely worth consideration. However, a card like this has to have some sort of major draw-back to be all the way down here. Luck Bird only offers a minuscule 5k attack, and is absolutely useless as a Vanguard; offering neither offensive power nor a useful effect. If you want to have anything resembling a useful offense, you’re going to want to play something over this card as soon as possible, which will likely erase and card advantage that this card brings about. Also, as having a large soul is somewhat beneficial to OTT, removing two of it isn’t helpful. Especially if you end up removing part of the Tsukuyomi ride chain; You’ll lose the effects of the later cards, and drop Full Moon’s attack to 9k. I’m not going to recommend an amount of this card to run, but I’ll leave it here as something to think about including if you want to try new things.
  • Petal Fairy: One of the few OTT units that offers an effect upon boosting a successful attack, Petal Fairly allows you to discard a card from your hand in order to draw a card. It’s not a terrible effect, as it helps to shorten the time till your endgame stack. Petal Fairy is crippled by its 6k attack, as are the majority of OTT boosters. Not to mention, it’s useless as a Vanguard. Just like Luck Bird, I’m not going to recommend an amount of these to run. However, it’s here as a semi-viable option.
  • Oracle Guardian, Blue-Eye: Of the two matching-theme monster cards with varying eye colors, Blue-Eye happens to be the inferior one in this game (as opposed to Red-Eye, which is a Grade 2). Its 5k attack is an instant turn-away, and the sole reason why this card isn’t in a higher recommendation bracket. OTT cards are fairly weak to begin with, and have to rely on their boosters in order to do any noticeable damage. However, its effect is a phenomenal one for this deck. If it boosts a successful attack, and if you have at least 6 Soul, then you can draw a card and send a card from your hand to the bottom of your deck. It’s fantastic for trigger stacking, however, the 6 Soul limitation forces it to be played mid-game or later, when you typically are trying to hit for larger numbers. An effect-boosted Amaterasu boosted by this will only swing for a piddly 19k; a full-powered Full Moon will barely reach 16k. Again, I’m only presenting this here as an option to consider using if you want to try out new ideas.

Recommended Grade 1’s (13-14):

  • 4x Oracle Guardian, Gemini
  • 4x Goddess of the Crescent Moon, Tsukuyomi (Preferred Grade 1 Vanguard)
  • 4x Battle Sister, Chocolat
  • 1x Battle Sister, Cocoa
  • 1x Weather Girl, Milk

***Grade 2 Units***

Now, we’re finally starting to move up in the world. Grade 2 is where the brilliance of an Oracle Think Tank deck truly starts to shine. Be prepared to make lots of hard decisions, as there are a ton of fantastic cards to choose from here. Each card brings with it a unique threat, and a completely different play style. Your opponents will be tempted to wipe out many of your Rearguard grade 2 units, as they can be ridiculously dangerous if left on the field for any length of time.

Pretty much necessary:

  • Goddess of the Half Moon, Tsukuyomi: As your preferred Grade 2 Ride and part of the Tsukuyomi line, it’s only fitting that she end up as the only Grade 2 that’s truly necessary for an OTT deck at this point. She inherits the Vanguard effect of Godhawk / Crescent Moon, allowing you to check the top 5 cards of your deck for Goddess of the Full Moon, Tsukuyomi for that Superior Ride (Again, can’t do a normal Ride if you did the Superior Ride), and shove the remaining cards on the bottom of your deck in any order, further adding to your end-game stack. If that effect alone isn’t enough to convince you to run her, then look at her secondary effect. If Godhawk, Ichibiyoshi and Goddess of the Crescent Moon, Tsukuyomi are both in the soul, then upon calling this card as a Vanguard, you can Soulcharge 2 cards from the top of your deck. I don’t feel the need to explain why that’s good at this point, but trust me: it’s good.  On top of that, Half Moon sports a respectable 9k attack. Anything 6k or above boosting it will allow it to hit 15k, forcing an opponent to use at least 10k worth of shields to guard a 10k unit. I assume that you’re going to stick with the Tsukuyomi line, so run 4 of these.

Highly Recommended:

  • Silent Tom: As the only Ghost present in Oracle Think Tank, it’s understandable that Tom is one of the most frightening units that this clan has to offer. An attack score of 8k makes it fairly hard to defend, and makes it reliant on at least a 7k boost to have any offensive presence. But, it’s the effect of Silent Tom, unique amongst every card in the game, that makes it so powerful. When it attacks, your opponent cannot use a Grade 0 unit to guard against it. Sure, you’ll only be hitting for 15k-16k at best, but against a 10k-11k unit, your opponent will be forced to use 10k shield to guard against it. And since the only units naturally sporting 10k shield are Grade 0’s, they will be forced to use two of their Grade 1-2 units to stop it. This forces your opponent to either lose the Rearguard you attacked / eat the damage it dishes out, or to drastically reduce their hand in order to protect their cards / life. If you can keep this card out for 2-3 turns, your opponent will get crazy-desperate to get it off the field. However, it doesn’t help toward your end-game stack, and it’s a difficult card to protect. A 10k beater coming at it with an 8k booster will force you to drop 15k shield to protect it, which generally isn’t worth the cost. I would recommend running at least 2 of them in any OTT deck.
  • Oracle Guardian, Red Eye: I briefly referred to this card in the Grade 1 section, mentioning how it was better than its blue-eyed counterpart. Its 9k attack makes it fairly competent as an attacking force, and it needs to be to make good use of its effect. If this card manages to land an attack against the opponent, you can Soulcharge a card from the top of your deck. If you somehow end up missing one of the Tsukuyomi rides, you can get lucky and use Red Eye to Soulcharge it from your deck.  You can potentially have Cocoa work in tandem with Red-Eye to semi-guarantee that.  Not to mention, it speeds up Amaterasu’s Soul Blast, and gets you to 6 Soul faster so that you can use more card effects. Depending on how you build a deck, I’d recommend running anywhere between 0-4 of these.
  • Oracle Guardian, Wiseman: Your vanilla 10k beater. Every clan has at  least one of these units, and many clans tend to run these in 4s. You are free to do so; however, OTT gives you a ton of choices for your Grade 2’s. Having a 10k beater with 5k intercept is always nice for a field, and a Rearguard Wiseman tends to be ignored by an opponent deciding what to attack, which is generally beneficial, as you can always use it to intercept something in case you don’t want to lose another Rearguard. If you end up not being able to ride into Half-Moon, then Wiseman is a splendid secondary choice. Depending on how you want to play, you can run anywhere between 0-4 of these, and still have a powerful deck.
  • Battle Sister, Mocha: At first glance, it’s an unassuming 8k unit. However, it can give itself a 3k buff on your turn if you have 4 or more cards in your hand. If you find it difficult to maintain more than two cards in your hand at the start of your turn, a Twin Drive!! will bump you up to the 4 cards that you need to turn Mocha into a powerhouse.  If you ended up riding this unit for some reason, having 3 cards in your hand when you attack will add the 4th card necessary to allow Mocha to swing for that extra damage.  11k is a fantastic number on its own, virtually guaranteeing damage / shield usage upon an attack. You can run anywhere between 0 and 4 of these, depending on how you want to play.
  • Battle Maiden, Tagitsuhime: Currently unavailable in English.  With a default 9k attack, it rivals the likes of Red-Eye and Half-Moon.  However, it holds a special place in the Soulful OTT build, as it’s one of the few cards that can actually utilize the massive Soul you amass for a beneficial effect.  Upon reaching 6 Soul, this card gains an extra 3k attack for the duration of your turn.  With a Gemini boosting her, she becomes one of the few Grade 2 units that can consistently hit for 20k per turn, making her an invaluable unit in this deck.  Once she is released, she will tower over Mocha and Wiseman, in terms of raw power and utility.  You can run anywhere between 0-4 of these, but having at least a few around is always an excellent decision for this deck.

Recommended:

  • Security Guardian: The Superior Intercept of the OTT clan: an 8k attacker that can intercept an attack with 10k shield instead of 5k. As you might be aware, 10k shields are quite hard to come by in OTT, what with all of your Draw Triggers. Having something on the field that gives you extra potential shield just by sitting there is always neat. The 8k attack isn’t that fantastic though; it tends to bring you trouble in both the offensive and defensive categories. If your opponent decides to target it with an 18k beatstick, then I’d just reason that it was a beneficial trade (which tends to happen a lot). I wouldn’t recommend running anymore than 2 of these in a deck.
  • Faithful Angel: A measly 7k attack prevents this card from being more than just ‘Recommended’, but it’s the effect of this card that makes it useful enough to end up on this list. If it manages to successfully land an attack, then you can draw a card, and place a card from your hand at the bottom of your deck. In order to have a chance at landing an attack with this, you have to boost it at least by 8k (Gemini), so that it can hit that 15k magic number that makes 10k cards quake in fear. If you’re incredibly focused on the endgame stack, then I’d consider running a few of these.

Honorable Mentions:

  • Blue Scale Deer: Another 7k attacker that needs an 8k boost to be useful. When it successfully lands an attack, you can Soulblast 2 in order to draw a card. It’s basically a stronger Luck Bird. I could imagine running both in the same deck, but not with Luck Bird boosting this thing, as your opponent will laugh as they throw a single 5k shield at you, and focus on your Vanguard instead of meager pinpricks. And as with Luck Bird, any card advantage generated by this thing will likely be ignored as you replace this card on the field with a better Rearguard.  As the game drags on, you’ll find yourself with at least 10 cards in the Soul, and not much use for them.  Blue Scale Deer allows you to utilize some of that Soul.  However, at that point in the game, you are likely well into the process of thinning down your deck, and you typically want stronger cards out on the field than a 7k Rearguard.
  • Maiden of Libra: I’ll be honest: I don’t like this card. However, my personal dislike of a card is little reason to not mention it here. It’s a 9k attacker, which is extremely respectful for a Grade 2. It’s one of the few cards in this deck that utilizes Counterblast, so if you find yourself wanting to use those instead of save up for other effects, you can Counterblast 2 upon this card landing an attack to draw a card. It’s a nice effect, but other cards can better utilize that Counterblast (Grade 3’s, no less), and there are better Grade 2’s that you can include. At an absolute maximum, I’d consider running 2. However, I prefer to just not use any.
  • Onmyoji of the Moonlit Night: “The Poor-Man’s Mocha”. With 8k attack, and an effect allowing you to boost this cards attack by 3k if you have some amount of cards in your hand, it seems exactly like Mocha. However, the condition is that you have more cards in your hand than your opponent, which can be harder at times to meet than Mocha’s condition. It has the real-world benefit that it’s only a common from Extra Booster 3, as opposed to being a Set 1 RR like Mocha. Hence, “The Poor-Man’s Mocha”.

Recommended Grade 2’s (12):

  • 4x Goddess of the Half Moon, Tsukuyomi (Preferred Grade 2 Vanguard)
  • 2x Silent Tom
  • 2x Oracle Guardian, Wiseman
  • 2x Oracle Guardian, Red Eye
  • 2x Battle Sister, Mocha

***Grade 3 Units***

Generally, this is the part of the deck where the ‘flavor’ of the deck is decided. Simply seeing an opponent’s Grade 3 unit can give you a good idea of what the deck itself is supposed to do. Many clans have a large variety of Grade 3’s, making it quite difficult to decide whether or not they can easily spam units to the field, or vastly empower the few units they have out. Oracle Think Tank, for now, doesn’t have that variety. There are a total of 6 Grade 3’s to choose from.  Fortunately, most of them have clear-cut roles in the deck, and some of them just aren’t as good as the others; especially after considering the rest of the cards that will go into a deck. Due to those factors, it’s actually recommended by most OTT players to use only 7 Grade 3 units. So, without further ado, my recommendations:

Pretty much Necessary:

  • CEO Amaterasu: Standing at 10k, this card is the epitome of the Oracle Think Tank. The main allure of this card is the following Vanguard effect: ‘At the beginning of your main phase, [Soul-Charge 1], look at the top card of your deck, and put that card on the top or the bottom of your deck.’ It fills up your soul, shortening the time it takes to get to your stack, and it also lets you add to the stack, and predict triggers. CEO also has a second Vanguard effect, granting it a 4k boost on attack if you have more than 4 cards in your hand. It’s not typically difficult to meet that requirement, but even if you have only 2 cards in your hand at the start of the turn, a Twin Drive!! will bump you up to at least 4, letting you hit for 14k + boosts/trigger bonuses. If that isn’t enough, it also gains a Vanguard/Rearguard effect, allowing you to Megablast (Soulblast 8 and Counterblast 5) upon a successful attack to draw 5 cards, which isn’t too shabby for a Megablast effect. I have little need to mention the card advantage gained there (hint: it’s +5), or the fact that it puts you 5 cards closer to your stack. As a Vanguard, CEO is top-tier. As a Rearguard, CEO is borderline terrible: Any Grade 2 would perform better, and be able to intercept. I’d only consider playing her as a Rearguard if I really wanted that Megablast to go off. I would recommend running between 2 and 3.
  • Goddess of the Full Moon, Tsukuyomi: This is the final step of your Ride Chain, that you’ve hopefully been working on since Godhawk, Ichibyoshi. It’s the only 11k unit OTT has to offer, and it’s quite useful to boot. It suffers from a -2k penalty, regardless of being Vanguard/Rearguard, if any of the prior pieces are missing from the Soul. If you have a few of these out, think carefully before using Soulblast / Megablast, as it’s easy to forget that you’re now missing that Soul requirement. Tsukuyomi has another Vanguard effect when you have attained 6 Soul, which is fairly easy with the Ride Chain (Godhawk, Crescent Moon, Full Moon, +2 from Full Moon’s effect), and cards like Psychic Bird and Red Eye. That effect allows you to Counterblast 2 in order to draw two cards, and place a card from your hand into the Soul. If you happen to be missing part of the Ride Chain to get Tsukuyomi up to 11k, you can use this effect to Soulcharge that part from your hand. It’s also a plus, as far as hand-advantage is concerned. Keep in mind that if you use a Counterblast effect, you will likely not be able to pull off CEO Amaterasu’s Megablast. It’s not too much of an issue, as this effect is much more reliable to pull off, and doesn’t have any constraints (have to land an attack, upon calling, etc.). Run 3-4 of these.

Somewhat-Recommended:

  • Secretary Angel: At 9k, it’s the weakest Grade 3 that OTT could muster. Thus, I’d only recommend it as a Rearguard unit. It has one effect, available both as a Vanguard and a Rearguard unit. If you land an attack with this card, and you have 6+ Soul, you can draw a card, then place a card from your hand onto the bottom of your deck. It’s fairly hard to pull off, as a wisened opponent will likely guard against this, but if you can use the effect, it’s probably the most powerful one out there, as far as aiding your end-game stack. You’re able to pick a card from your hand, and place it at the bottom of your deck. If that doesn’t help toward stacking the deck, I don’t know what would. If you can’t afford a 3 CEO / 4 Full Moon core, I’d substitute the remainder with these.

Honorable Mention:

  • Oracle Guardian, Apollon: Formerly one of the only two choices available to OTT players (the other being Amaterasu), Apollon still manages to be somewhat useful here. It brings 10k to the table, which is essentially the default power that you’re going to find on any Grade 3 with a good effect. As a Vanguard, a successful attack with this card will allow you to Counterblast 2 cards in order to draw 2 cards, then shuffle a card back into the deck. Of course, using that effect would not only ruin your chances of a potential Megablast, but it would also eradicate any of the work you’ve put into stacking triggers. Using effects to shuffle the deck is completely against what you want to do here. The Rearguard effect is much more desirable here, allowing you to Counterblast 2 and draw a card. It’s essentially a stronger Maiden of Libra. I’m not too much of a fan of this card either, but being forced to use it as an early OTT player somewhat made it grow on me.

Recommended Grade 3’s (7):

  • 3x CEO Amaterasu
  • 4x Goddess of the Full Moon, Tsukuyomi

Now, before you start questioning the numbers of cards that I placed here, I want to stress that I made this deck as a test example. It’s playable and competitive, yes. But, I chose a small number of a variety of different cards to help you, the person who might potentially build this deck, to discover how you prefer to play this deck on your own. You might decide to drop the Wisemans in favor of more Mochas, or you might go with a different trigger distribution. I just made this deck to show you many of the ideas that you’ll be running into when you play this deck, and some of the ways that you can play mind-games with your opponent. Splitting the 7 draw triggers among 3 different types of cards can make it look like you’re running a different number of triggers than you truly are. Find what you like best in this deck, and run with it. I won’t judge you if you decide to run Maiden of Libra, or a Grade 3 unit like Omniscience Madonna (which I purposefully neglected to mention).

And yes, most of this came from an earlier reddit post of mine.

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